November 4, 2014 General Election News and Information

By Michael D. Robbins
October 31, 2014

Election information and recommendations for the November 4, 2014 General Election will be posted here on the days leading up to the election. Please check back regularly. This will include recommendations for candidates and ballot measures, possibly including judges.

Here are some ground-rules for this election:

  1. Vote Against Scott Houston!
    Vote for Stephen Murray instead for West Basin Municipal Water District, Division 4 Director.
  2. Vote Against Al Muratsuchi!
    Vote for David Hadley instead in California’s 66th State Assembly District.
  3. Ignore All Campaign Slate Mailers!
  4. Vote Against Candidates Endorsed and Supported by Firefighter, Police, Teacher, and Other Government Employee Unions who expect large pay and pension increases and tax hikes to pay for those increases.
  5. Vote Against Candidates Endorsed by Militant And Extortionist Labor Unions who artificially increase consumer prices and taxes.

VOTE AGAINST SCOTT HOUSTON!

Vote for Stephen Murray instead.

BE SURE to vote AGAINST Scott Houston for West Basin Municipal Water District, Division 4, Member of the Board of Directors if you DO NOT want additional unnecessary water rate increases. Vote for Stephen Murray instead. All three candidates are “progressive” (ultra-liberal) Democrats, but Scott Houston is the absolute worst. If he had his way and was successful, El Segundo residents and businesses would have lost our local fire department, and would have suffered at least THIRTEEN TAX HIKES to pay for wildly excessive and unsustainable firefighter and police union salary, benefits, and pension increases handed out as rewards for campaign support to City Council candidates.

VOTE AGAINST AL MURATSUCHI!

Vote for David Hadley instead in California’s 66th State Assembly District.

He has voted as a rubber stamp for nearly all of the radical Democrat agenda, including making California into a sanctuary state for illegal aliens including gangsters, drug smugglers, and terrorists; expanding rights and privileges for illegal aliens while reducing rights and freedoms for citizens; banning plastic bags; banning traditional self-defense, sporting, and collectible firearms including even single-shot handguns; and more.

IGNORE ALL CAMPAIGN SLATE MAILERS!

Candidates and campaigns for and against ballot measures PAY to appear in those slate mailers regardless of their political party, voting record, politics, and agendas. They are phony and deceptive. They almost always have no connection to the causes they claim they represent, such as protecting Proposition 13, taxpayers, and women. They are tailored for the registered political party of the recipients to deceive them.

There will be more information to come. Please check back regularly between now and the close of polls on election day, and after election day for recommendations and analysis.

VOTE AGAINST CANDIDATES ENDORSED AND SUPPORTED BY BY FIREFIGHTER, POLICE, TEACHER, AND OTHER GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE UNIONS

Firefighter, police, teacher, and other government employee unions endorse, contribute to, and support the campaigns of the candidates and ballot measures that will give them the biggest salary, benefits, and pension increases, no matter how excessive and unsustainable, and raise our taxes and fees to pay for it all. That is why many cities in California are being pushed down the road toward bankruptcy, and some have already filed for bankruptcy.

There is an inherent and unavoidable conflict of interest when government employees are allowed to unionize and engage in collective bargaining, and then exercise their inalienable First Amendment right to campaign to elect (hire) their own bosses who will negotiate their salaries, benefits, and pensions with them and give final approval in secret (closed session) meetings.

VOTE AGAINST CANDIDATES ENDORSED BY MILITANT AND EXTORTIONIST LABOR UNIONS

Vote against candidates endorsed by unions that use militant and extortionist tactics including sabotage, endangerment, and/or violence to force employers to unionize their employees and meet the union bosses’ demands, or be forced out of business.

Vote against candidates endorsed by the SEIU. Their official Contract Campaign Manual, made public by discovery in a lawsuit against them, teaches extortionist methods to sabotage businesses in ways that can get innocent employees and customers killed.

Thank you.

Mike Robbins


Posted in California, El Segundo, El Segundo Election Coverage, El Segundo News, El Segundo Tax and Fee Increases, Firefighter Union Corruption, Police Union Corruption, Political Corruption, Union Corruption | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Phony Candidates and Slate Mailers – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Marianne Fong

The following letter to the editor was published in the El Segundo Herald newspaper (HeraldPublications.com) on Thursday, October 30, 2014 in the Letters section on page 3. The El Segundo Herald has a strict 250-word limit, including the title.


Phony Candidates and Slate Mailers

Vote for Murray for West Basin Municipal Water District.

I received a phony campaign slate mailer titled “SAVE PROPOSITION 13 NEWSLETTER” with Scott Houston’s name and photo in it. It’s not a newsletter at all, but a deceptive campaign slate mailer that has nothing to do with Proposition 13.

This is ironic. The current newsletter of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, founded by Proposition 13 sponsor Howard Jarvis, honors Mike Robbins as a “Hometown Hero” for leading the successful campaign against Measure A and its eleven tax hikes last April, despite city unions contributing $17,500 to the “Yes on A” campaign. But Scott Houston supported Measure A! See his 3/13/14 Herald letter. And Houston ran for Democratic Party Central Committee on 6/3/08 as a self-described progressive (extreme tax-and-spend liberal).

A call to HJTA confirmed they do not endorse Scott Houston, and have no connection to nor control over that slate mailer. Houston paid to get his name and photo in it, as indicated by the asterisk next to his name.

Similarly, there are phony “For Republicans” slate mailers sent to Republican voters, endorsing progressive Democrats. Please disregard all slate mailers unless you are sure you know and trust their source.

Houston claims in his Sample Ballot statement his occupation is “Environmental Impact Manager.” He claimed it was “Small Business Manager” when he ran for City Council on 4/10/12. He is not a manager. He’s a “Customer Service” employee at an envelope manufacturing and printing company.

– Marianne Fong


Posted in California, El Segundo, El Segundo Election Coverage, El Segundo Herald Letters, El Segundo News, El Segundo Tax and Fee Increases, Elections, Firefighter Union Corruption, Letters to the Editor, Measure A - 5 New Taxes and 6 Tax Inceases, Police Union Corruption, Political Corruption, Politics, Tax Policy and Issues, Union Corruption | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Support Hadley against extremist Muratsuchi – Letter to the Daily Breeze by Marianne Fong

The following letter to the editor was published in the Daily Breeze newspaper Letters section (DailyBreeze.com/letters). The Daily Breeze has a 150-word limit.

http://www.dailybreeze.com/opinion/20141028/in-south-bay-support-hadley-against-extremist-muratsuchi-letters


Daily Breeze

dailybreeze.com

LAX TO L.A. HARBOR

In South Bay, support Hadley against extremist Muratsuchi: Letters

POSTED: 10/28/14, 3:12 PM PDT | 0 COMMENTS

Support Hadley against extremist Muratsuchi

Please vote for David Hadley in the 66th State Assembly District. His opponent, Al Muratsuchi, voted for the extremist Democrat agenda while pretending to be a moderate. For example, Muratsuchi voted for AB 1266, which requires schools to allow K-12 students to use the bathrooms, locker rooms and showers of the sex of their choice, regardless of their biological sex.

Muratsuchi’s campaign called my father’s home, claiming he is endorsed by the Redondo Beach, Torrance and Gardena police departments. That is false. Muratsuchi is endorsed by police, fire, and other government unions, which is a conflict of interest. They endorse candidates whose votes will give them the biggest pay and pension increases, and raise our taxes to pay for it. That’s why police and firefighter total compensation is $150,000 to more than $330,000 per year.

Muratsuchi’s campaign is attacking those who believe we are taxed enough already. Please disagree by voting for David Hadley.

Marianne Fong, El Segundo


Posted in Beach Reporter Letters, California, Elections, Firefighter and Police Union Compensation and Pensions, Firefighter Union Corruption, Government Employee Compensation and Pensions, Letters to the Editor, Police Union Corruption, Political Corruption, Politics, Union Corruption | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Vote AGAINST Scott Houston – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Mike Robbins

The following letter to the editor was published in the El Segundo Herald newspaper (HeraldPublications.com) on Thursday, October 23, 2014 in the Letters section on page 3. The El Segundo Herald has a strict 250-word limit, including the title.


Vote AGAINST Scott Houston

Vote AGAINST Scott Houston for West Basin Municipal Water District Board of Directors if you don’t want additional unnecessary water rate increases. Two-time City Council loser Houston is the absolute worst of three “progressive” (ultra-liberal/leftist) Democrats running. Vote FOR Stephen Murray instead.

Houston supported Measure P, the firefighter union’s initiative (4/10/12 ballot), which was defeated by 90% of El Segundo voters. It would have disbanded our local Fire Department and transferred our fire and paramedic services, and firefighters, to Los Angeles County for inferior services. It would have eliminated 31% of our on-duty firefighters, two paramedic squads, and all three paramedic transport ambulances, doubling hospital transport times.

Houston lobbied the City Council (2/15/11 meeting video) to enact Measure P directly into law without allowing the voters to vote on it!

Houston supported THIRTEEN TAX HIKES, including ELEVEN TAX HIKES in Measure A (4/8/14 ballot; 3/13/14 Herald letter).

Houston took endorsements and huge campaign contributions from the police officers’ “association” (union). Police, firefighter, and other government unions support candidates and ballot measures that will give them the biggest pay and pension increases, and raise our taxes to pay for it. That’s why our police and firefighters are paid $150,000 to $330,000 each in total annual compensation.

Houston campaigns claiming qualifications and positions he does not possess. He wants to use WBMWD as a stepping stone to higher office to promote Big Government tax-and-spend “progressive” politics.

Houston is a government union puppet, not a representative of the people.

– Mike Robbins


NOTES BY MICHAEL D. ROBBINS:

This letter was submitted with an error that is corrected above. “Metropolitan” was corrected to “Municipal”. I was researching both the West Basin Municipal Water District (WBMWD) and its up-stream water provider Metropolitan Water District (MWD) just before I wrote this letter, hence the mistake.

Houston lobbied the City Council at its February 15, 2011 meeting to enact Measure P directly into law without allowing the voters to vote on it. You can watch the video of him doing this below.



Scott Houston also lobbied the El Segundo City Council at its August 3, 2010 meeting to raise the Hotel Transient Occupancy Tax and Business Utility User Taxes (UUTs), to provide more tax revenue to pay for past and future excessive and unsustainable firefighter and police union and manager pay and pension increases. You can watch the video of him doing this below.




Posted in California, El Segundo, El Segundo Election Coverage, El Segundo Herald Letters, El Segundo News, El Segundo Tax and Fee Increases, Elections, Firefighter and Police Union Compensation and Pensions, Firefighter Union Corruption, Government Employee Compensation and Pensions, Letters to the Editor, Measure A - 5 New Taxes and 6 Tax Inceases, Measure P - Firefighters Union Initiative, Police Union Corruption, Political Corruption, Politics, Tax Policy and Issues, Union Corruption | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (HJTA) honors former El Segundo City Councilman Mike Robbins

October 1, 2014

The Jarvis Taxpayers Association (HJTA), founded by California Proposition 13 sponsor Howard Jarvis, has honored former El Segundo City Councilman Mike Robbins as a “Hometown Hero” for leading the successful campaign to defeat Measure A in the April 8, 2014 El Segundo General Municipal Election. Measure A had ELEVEN tax hikes in one ballot measure!

Here is the article in their official statewide newsletter, Taxing Times, Vol. 40, Issue 3 for Fall 2014:


HOMETOWN HEROES

HJTA was very pleased to receive the following update from former El Segundo councilman Mike Robbins after local Election Day, April 8. Here are excerpts:

We had a great victory in El Segundo last night! The citizens and taxpayers won, and the city-employee unions with lots of campaign money and a significant conflict of interest lost – AGAIN!

Thank you to everyone who helped.

El Segundo Measure A, ELEVEN TAX HIKES IN ONE MEASURE, taxing RESIDENTS and BUSINESSES, lost by 57% NO to 43% YES, despite the “Yes on A” campaign spending a whopping $33,129.87 in small-town El Segundo, including $17,500 from four city-employee unions – $5,000 from the fire union, $5,000 from the police union, $5,000 from the city employees’ union, and $2,500 from the California Teamsters Public Affairs Council in Sacramento (supervisory and professional employees’ union) at a cost of $25.74 per vote.

Measure A would have created new taxes on residents for electricity, water, gas, and all forms of “communications services,” including landline telephones, cell phones, Internet, cable TV, and satellite, to pay for excessive compensation and pensions for city employees. Firefighters and police are paid $150,000 to more than $380,000 each in total compensation per year.

I, together with two other former El Segundo City Council members, and two other long-term city residents, co-authored and submitted an argument against Measure A and a rebuttal to the argument for Measure A, and I authored and distributed two one-page double-sided campaign flyers on Saturday, April 5, and a third on Sunday, April 6.

The HJTA hat is off to Mike and other active El Segundo taxpayers who made this victory possible.



Scan of top half of front page of Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (HJTA) newsletter (Vol. 40, Issue 3, Fall 2014).

Scan image of top half of front page of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (HJTA) newsletter (Vol. 40, Issue 3, Fall 2014).


Scan image of the article in the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (HJTA) newsletter (Vol. 40, Issue 3, Fall 2014), honoring Mike Robbins as a "Hometown Hero".

Scan image of the article in the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (HJTA) newsletter (Vol. 40, Issue 3, Fall 2014), honoring Mike Robbins as a “Hometown Hero”.


NOTE FROM MICHAEL D. ROBBINS:

I am pleased to be recognized and honored by the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (HJTA), in its statewide newsletter, as a “Hometown Hero” for my leadership role in defeating ballot Measure A in the El Segundo, California General Municipal Election on April 8, 2014. Measure A was ELEVEN TAX HIKES IN ONE MEASURE, taxing RESIDENTS and BUSINESSES to pay for wildly excessive compensation and pensions for city employees.

The recognition was published in the Fall 2014 HJTA newsletter (Vol. 40, Issue 3), received by local HJTA members on October 1, 2014.

The government employee unions endorse, contribute money to, and campaign for the candidates and ballot measures that will give them the biggest pay raises and pension increases, no matter how unsustainable, and then raise taxes and fees on residents and businesses to try to pay for it all.

The fire and police unions are the most politically active, even though they have the biggest conflict of interest due to their positions of authority and public trust, and as emergency service providers. As a result of their dishonest campaign activities over many decades, El Segundo firefighters and police have total compensation of $150,000 to more than $380,000 each per year.

The government employee unions, especially the fire and police unions, are pushing California cities down the road to bankruptcy. For example, the City of Vallejo, California, filed for bankruptcy as a direct result of its fire and police unions.

Here’s my description of HJTA:

HJTA is a California nonprofit organization founded by Howard Jarvis who, together with Paul Gahn, sponsored, campaigned for, and won passage of the famous Proposition 13, California’s property tax limitation voter initiative. Proposition 13 limits property taxes to one percent of the property purchase price per year, plus a small annual increase. It requires a super-majority vote to approve additional local property tax assessments.

Proposition 13 saved California homeowners from being taxed out of their homes when property taxes were raised mercilessly above what they could afford. The property tax increases forced many homeowners to sell their homes to pay the property taxes, resulting in huge federal and state income taxes that consumed much of the sales price. However, much of the “profit” from the increase in home values was actually the result of government-created inflation, which significantly reduced the value of the dollar and artificially increased prices.

The homeowners’ pleas for help fell on deaf ears in the state legislature, which was dominated by tax-and-spend liberals. So Howard Jarvis and Paul Gahn took matters into their own hands. They bypassed the legislature and went straight to the voters by using California’s voter initiative process.

However, since the passage of Proposition 13, the Democrat majority in the state legislature, and the government employee unions, have been working to weaken and repeal Proposition 13, and to effectively repeal California’s voter initiative process by rendering it ineffective and useless.

HJTA continuously works to protect Proposition 13, and to enact additional taxpayer protections such as Proposition 218, which allows property owners and tenants to cast protest local government fee increases.

You can support the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association by visiting their website, www.HJTA.org.


Posted in California, El Segundo, El Segundo News, El Segundo Tax and Fee Increases, Elections, Firefighter and Police Union Compensation and Pensions, Firefighter Union Corruption, Government Employee Compensation and Pensions, Measure A - 5 New Taxes and 6 Tax Inceases, Police Union Corruption, Political Corruption, Politics, Tax Policy and Issues, Union Corruption | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

FBI: Racketeering and Arson Charges Filed Against Members of Ironworkers Union – Places of Worship Among Arson Targets

by Michael D. Robbins
Director, Public Safety Project, PublicSafetyProject.org

Labor unions in the U.S. have a long history violent crime, including racketeering, harassment, intimidation, extortion, sabotage, arson, assault, murder, mass-murder, domestic terrorism, and more. This legacy of union thuggery continues to this day for many labor unions, and the guilty often go unpunished and are allowed to continue their anti-social criminal behavior.

Although some news reporters dubbed the O. J. Simpson double-murder trial as “the trial of the century”, another far more significant though shorter trial was given that label early in the twentieth century.

The McNamara brothers, James B. McNamara and John J. McNamara, were active in the International Association of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers, a labor union headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana. The union organized and represented workers in the construction industry, and was particularly active on the West Coast. Los Angeles Times publisher Harrison Gray Otis used his newspaper to accuse the union of being responsible for the dynamiting of construction sites that used non-union labor.

On October 1, 1910, in an act of domestic terrorism and mass-murder, a bomb exploded in the Los Angeles Times downtown printing plant building, murdering 20 people and causing considerable damage to the building. Soon after that, there was another bombing at the Llewellyn Iron Works in Los Angeles.

Evidence was found linking the two McNamara brothers to these bombings, and they were put on trial. The trial began on December 1, 1911. James B. McNamara ultimately admitted to bombing the Times building, and John J. McNamara confessed to dynamiting the Llewellyn Iron Works. On December 5, 1911, Judge Walter Bordwell sentenced James McNamara to life in prison, and John McNamara to 15 years in prison.


In a more recent case of union thuggery and terrorism, an indictment was unsealed on February 18, 2014 and arrests were made in a case charging 10 members of the Ironworkers Local 401 union with allegedly participating in a conspiracy to commit criminal acts of extortion, arson, destruction of property, and assault in order to force construction contractors to hire union ironworkers.

“The strong-arm tactics we have seen in this case are outrageous and brazen,” said FBI Special Agent in Charge Edward J. Hanko, adding that “violence, intimidation, arson, and sabotage are crimes which won’t be tolerated. This investigation has been wide-ranging, but it is far from over. Now that this indictment has been unsealed, we expect to hear from more victims and will aggressively pursue all other leads we receive.”

If convicted of all charges, four of the 10 defendants each face a mandatory minimum term of 35 years in prison up to a statutory maximum of 130 years.

The indictment charges RICO conspiracy, violent crime in aid of racketeering, three counts of arson, two counts of use of fire to commit a felony, and conspiracy to commit arson. RICO refers to 18 U.S. Code Chapter 96Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations.

Eight of the 10 individuals named in the indictment are charged with conspiring to use Ironworkers Local 401 as an enterprise to commit criminal acts. The indictment details incidents in which the defendants threatened or assaulted contractors or their employees and damaged construction equipment and job sites as part of a concerted effort to force contractors to hire and pay Local 401 workers, even when those workers performed no function. Among the criminal acts set forth in the indictment is the December 2012 arson of a Quaker Meetinghouse under construction in Philadelphia.

According to the indictment, the defendants had a network of individuals, friendly to the Ironworkers Local 401, to spy on, scout out, and help identify construction projects and job sites where work was being performed without using Local 401 union members. Union business agents allegedly approached construction foremen at those work sites and implied or explicitly threatened violence, destruction of property or other criminal acts unless union members were hired.

The defendants relied on a reputation for violence and sabotage, which had been built up in the community over many years, in order to force contractors to hire union members. It is alleged that the defendants created “goon” squads, composed of union members and associates, to commit assaults, arsons, and destruction of property. One such squad referred to itself as the “The Helpful Union Guys”, or THUGs.

The indictment alleges that in the December 2012 arson of the Quaker Meeting House, after the contractor refused to hire union ironworkers, defendants Walsh, Gillin, and Hennigar went to the construction site at 20 East Mermaid Lane in Philadelphia. They set a crane on fire and cut steel beams and bolts.

In another episode of union thuggery set forth in the indictment, members of the Ironworkers Local 401 union picketed a construction site near King of Prussia Mall between May and June 2010 because the contractor did not hire union workers. It is alleged defendant Richard Ritchie and three others later resorted to violence when they assaulted some of the non-union workers with baseball bats.

In the July 2013 episode of union thuggery, the indictment alleges that defendants Sweeney and O’Donnell, under Dougherty’s direction, set up a picket line and threatened the contractor of an apartment complex under construction at 31st and Spring Garden Streets if he did not hire Local 401 members. According to the indictment, the contractor relinquished his profits and turned the job over to a union-affiliated contractor as a result of the threats.

The following ten Ironworkers Local 401 union officials and members were included in the indictment, and are facing prison terms from the specified mandatory minimum terms up to the specified statutory maximum terms if convicted of all charges:

  • Joseph Dougherty, 72, of Philadelphia, union financial secretary/business manager, 35 to 130 years;
  • Edward Sweeney, 55, of Philadelphia, union business agent, 35 to 130 years;
  • Francis Sean O’Donnell, 43, of Warminster, Pennsylvania, union business agent, up to 20 years;
  • Christopher Prophet, 43, of Richboro, Pennsylvania, union business agent, up to 40 years;
  • William O’Donnell, 61, of Cherry Hill, New Jersey, union business agent, up to 20 years;
  • James Walsh, 49, of Philadelphia, union member, 35 to 130 years;
  • William Gillin, 42, of Philadelphia, union member, 35 to 130 years;
  • Richard Ritchie, 44, of Philadelphia, union member, up to 40 years;
  • Daniel Hennigar, 53, of Philadelphia, union member, 15 to 40 years; and
  • Greg Sullivan, 49, of Philadelphia., union member, 5 to 40 years.

The charges were jointly announced on February 18, 2014 by the following government officials:

  • United States Attorney Zane David Memeger;
  • FBI Special Agent in Charge Edward J. Hanko;
  • Special Agent in Charge John Spratley with the Department of Labor’s Office of Inspector General; and
  • Special Agent in Charge Sam Rabadi with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (BATFE).

The case was investigated jointly by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Department of Labor Office of Inspector General, with assistance provided by the Philadelphia Police Department Corruption Task Force; East Whiteland Township Police Department; the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives; and the Employee Benefit Security Administration. It is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Robert Livermore with legal assistance from Gerald Toner, Acting Deputy Chief for Labor-Management Racketeering, Organized Crime, and Gang Section at the Department of Justice.

The complete text of the official FBI press release, dated February 18, 2014, is given below.


http://www.fbi.gov/philadelphia/press-releases/2014/racketeering-and-arson-charges-filed-against-members-of-ironworkers-union

THE FBI

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION

Philadelphia Division

Racketeering and Arson Charges Filed Against Members of Ironworkers Union

Places of Worship Among Arson Targets


U.S. Attorney’s Office
February 18, 2014

Eastern District of Pennsylvania
(215) 861-8200

PHILADELPHIA—An indictment (an indictment, information, or criminal complaint is an accusation. A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.) was unsealed today and arrests were made in a case charging 10 members of Ironworkers Local 401 with allegedly participating in a conspiracy to commit criminal acts of extortion, arson, destruction of property, and assault in order to force construction contractors to hire union ironworkers. Specifically, the indictment charges RICO conspiracy, violent crime in aid of racketeering, three counts of arson, two counts of use of fire to commit a felony, and conspiracy to commit arson. Eight of the 10 individuals named in the indictment are charged with conspiring to use Ironworkers Local 401 as an enterprise to commit criminal acts. Joseph Dougherty, 72, of Philadelphia, the financial secretary/business manager of Local 401, was one of the eight individuals charged with racketeering conspiracy. The indictment details incidents in which the defendants threatened or assaulted contractors or their employees and damaged construction equipment and job sites as part of a concerted effort to force contractors to hire and pay Local 401 workers, even when those workers performed no function. Among the criminal acts set forth in the indictment is the December 2012 arson of a Quaker Meetinghouse under construction in Philadelphia.

Charged with Dougherty are business agents Edward Sweeney, 55, of Philadelphia; Francis Sean O’Donnell, 43, of Warminster, Pennsylvania; Christopher Prophet, 43, of Richboro, Pennsylvania; William O’Donnell, 61, of Cherry Hill, New Jersey; union members James Walsh, 49; William Gillin, 42; Richard Ritchie, 44; Daniel Hennigar, 53; and Greg Sullivan, 49, all of Philadelphia.

The charges were announced today by United States Attorney Zane David Memeger, FBI Special Agent in Charge Edward J. Hanko, Special Agent in Charge John Spratley with the Department of Labor’s Office of Inspector General, and Special Agent in Charge Sam Rabadi with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives.

According to the indictment, the defendants had a network of individuals, friendly to the Ironworkers Local 401, to help identify construction projects and job sites where work was being performed without using Local 401 members. The indictment alleges that business agents would approach construction foremen at those work sites and imply or explicitly threaten violence, destruction of property or other criminal acts unless union members were hired. The defendants relied on a reputation for violence and sabotage, which had been built up in the community over many years, in order to force contractors to hire union members. It is alleged that the defendants created “goon” squads, composed of union members and associates, to commit assaults, arsons, and destruction of property. One such squad referred to itself as the “The Helpful Union Guys,” or THUGs.

In the December 2012 arson of the Quaker Meeting House, the indictment alleges that after the contractor refused to hire union ironworkers, defendants Walsh, Gillin, and Hennigar went to the construction site at 20 East Mermaid Lane in Philadelphia. They set a crane on fire and cut steel beams and bolts. In another episode set forth in the indictment, members of Local 401 picketed a construction site near King of Prussia Mall between May and June 2010 because the contractor did not hire union workers. It is alleged defendant Richard Ritchie and three others later resorted to violence when they assaulted some of the non-union workers with baseball bats. In the July 2013 episode, the indictment alleges that defendants Sweeney and O’Donnell, under Dougherty’s direction, set up a picket line and threatened the contractor of an apartment complex under construction at 31st and Spring Garden Streets if he did not hire Local 401 members. According to the indictment, the contractor relinquished his profits and turned the job over to a union-affiliated contractor as a result of the threats.

“While unions have the right to legally advocate on behalf of their members, my office will not tolerate the conduct of those who use violence to further union goals,” said United States Attorney Zane David Memeger. “Union officials and members who commit arson, destroy property, use threats of physical harm, and engage in other acts of violence to extort victims on behalf of their union need to be criminally prosecuted. Today’s indictment makes that clear.”

“The strong-arm tactics we have seen in this case are outrageous and brazen—and an unfortunate blow to the worthy intentions of unionism,” said Hanko. “The fight for workers’ rights may sometimes call for tough tactics, but violence, intimidation, arson, and sabotage are crimes which won’t be tolerated. This investigation has been wide-ranging, but it is far from over. Now that this indictment has been unsealed, we expect to hear from more victims and will aggressively pursue all other leads we receive.”

If convicted of all charges, defendants Dougherty, Sweeney, Walsh, and Gillin each face a mandatory minimum term of 35 years in prison up to a statutory maximum of 130 years; defendant Hennigar faces a mandatory minimum term of 15 years in prison up to a statutory maximum of 40 years; defendant Sullivan faces a mandatory minimum term of five years in prison up to a statutory maximum of 40 years; defendants Prophet and Ritchie face a statutory maximum of up to 40 years in prison; defendants Francis and William O’Donnell each face a statutory maximum of 20 years in prison.

The case was investigated jointly by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Department of Labor Office of Inspector General, with assistance provided by the Philadelphia Police Department Corruption Task Force; East Whiteland Township Police Department; the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives; and the Employee Benefit Security Administration. It is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Robert Livermore with legal assistance from Gerald Toner, Acting Deputy Chief for Labor-Management Racketeering, Organized Crime, and Gang Section at the Department of Justice.


FBI.gov is an official site of the U.S. government, U.S. Department of Justice

Posted in Crimes, Terrorism, Union Corruption, Violent Crime | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

April 8, 2014 El Segundo General Municipal Election News and Information

Last updated: Friday, May 9, 2014 at 01:45 AM PT.

This page will be updated regularly with links to informative articles about the upcoming April 8, 2014 El Segundo General Municipal Election.

Bookmark this page and review it often for breaking news and information.

(Posts are in priority order, not chronological order; newer posts appear in bold text.)


April 8, 2014 El Segundo General Municipal Election

Ballot Argument and Rebuttal Against El Segundo Measure A Tax Hikes

City of El Segundo 2014 Measure A Tax Hikes – City Attorney’s Impartial Analysis


Recapping the Election – Letter to The Beach Reporter by Michael Robbins

El Segundo Flyer #1: Vote “NO” on Measure A – Eleven Tax Hikes in One Measure!

El Segundo Flyer #3 – Vote “NO” on Measure A, and Against BILL FISHER!

Backup Documents, Photos, and Information for Statements in Recent Flyers Distributed on April 5, 2014

El Segundo City Employee Unions Contributed $17,500 to Measure A Tax Hikes Thus Far

Have the Measure A Supporters Earned Our Trust?

City of El Segundo Can Save $3.3 Million Per Year in Employee Pension Costs

Welcome to the City of El Segundo $100K+ CalPERS Pension Club!

El Segundo Herald Misreports City’s $6.3 Million Property Tax Revenue as $1 Million

El Segundo Firefighters’ Union is Bankrolling the Measure A Campaign to Hike Taxes

El Segundo Measure A Co-Chair Joe Harding was Against the Tax Hikes Before He was For Them

Wrong Time to Raise Taxes and Fees in El Segundo

Which El Segundo City Employee was Paid Nearly $600,000 in His Last Year?

2009-2010 City of El Segundo Separations due to Budgetary Reasons Mostly Early Retirements

Eleven El Segundo Police Department Positions “Eliminated” were Actually 911 Dispatchers Transferred to the South Bay Regional Public Communications (SBRPC) Authority


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:

April 15 Council Meeting – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Mike Robbins

Post-election Council meeting – Letter to The Beach Reporter by Michael Robbins

Council pay procedures – Letter to The Beach Reporter by Marianne Fong

Fellhauer is a Union Puppet – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Marianne Fong

Can We Save Mayberry? – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Marc Rener

Recapping the Election – Letter to The Beach Reporter by Michael Robbins

Fire Union Bankrolling “Yes on A” Campaign – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Marianne Fong

No on Measure A – Letter to The Beach Reporter by Michael Robbins

Not happy with Measure A – Letter to The Beach Reporter by Marianne Fong

No on Measure A – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Mike Robbins

Something Fishy About Measure A – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Marianne Fong

NO ON “A” – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Art Lavalle

A Correction is In Order – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Mike Robbins

No on Measure A – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Helen Armstrong

Frustration – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Richard J. Switz

Measure ‘A’ – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Richard J. Switz


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El Segundo Police and Firefighters Got Huge Raises During the Great Recession

by Michael D. Robbins
Director, Public Safety Project, PublicSafetyProject.org

May 20, 2014

The April 8, 2014 El Segundo General Municipal Election is over, and Mayor Bill Fisher has been defeated, in large part because of his tax-and-spend policies and his support for wildly excessive and unsustainable pay raises for the already over-compensated firefighter and police unions that helped launch his political career with lots of campaign support, and for their managers to prevent “salary compaction”.

However, Fisher, and also El Segundo Police Sergeant and former El Segundo Police Officers’ Association (union) President Mike Gill, have continued to campaign after the election is over. They continue to claim the El Segundo firefighter and police union salary increases I cited in my information flyers distributed before the election never happened, despite my overwhelming proof. Here is even more detailed proof for those who won’t click on the links to the official El Segundo City Council Agenda Packet PDF files on the City’s website to read the documents.

Sergeant Mike Gill’s multiple false statements at the May 6, 2014 El Segundo City Council meeting are troublesome, given that he is a sworn police sergeant in a position of authority and public trust, who must be trusted to testify honestly and accurately in court in the normal course of his police duties.

Mayor Fisher supported pay raises ranging from 11.25% to 23% for the firefighter and police unions, in three or four installments over three years, and single pay raises ranging from 14.9% to 32.3% for their managers, during the first three years of the Great Recession. All of the raises were approved well after the Great Recession started, and many included retroactive pay raises effective up to 6 and 9 months before the union contracts were approved. The firefighter and police union contracts included additional 5% annual “step raises”, and additional periodic “longevity raises”.

The pay raises were approved first in closed session City Council meetings, and then again in public as a formality at the open session City Council meetings referenced in the table below.

The total pay raises included the following (not counting compounding, which actually results in higher total raises):

JOB CLASSIFICATION PAY RAISE DATE APPROVED CONSENT AGENDA ITEM
Firefighters 11.25% April 7, 2009 E11
Fire Engineers 11.25% April 7, 2009 E11
Fire Captains 11.25% April 7, 2009 E11
Police Officers 15.0% April 7, 2009 E12
Police Sergeants 15.0% April 7, 2009 E12
Police Lieutenants 18.0% April 7, 2009 E8
Police Captains 23.0% April 7, 2009 E8
Fire Battalion Chiefs 16.9% December 2, 2008 E8
Deputy Fire Chief 14.9% December 2, 2008 E8
Police Chief 23% December 2, 2008 E8
Fire Chief 32.3% December 2, 2008 E8

In addition to the above pay raises, the firefighter and police employees were (and still are) given 5% annual “step raises” in each of the first four or five years after the year they are promoted or assigned to a new position.

In addition to the above pay raises, the firefighter and police employees were (and still are) given periodic “longevity” raises every so many years.

The information below provides details about the big pay raises given to the El Segundo firefighters and police during the Great Recession.


A short list of police and firefifghter pay raises in 2009 and 2008 appear below, followed by more detailed lists of police and firefighter key contract provisions.


The firefighters union contract MOU No. 3928 was approved at the April 7, 2009 El Segundo City Council meeting (Consent Agenda item E11), well after the 2008 recession started. Look at the agenda item (E11) in the Agenda Packet to see the MOU. It covers the Firefighter, Fire Paramedic, Fire Engineer, and Fire Captain ranks (but not the Battalion Chief, Deputy Fire Chief, and Fire Chief ranks, which are management ranks).

It provided an 11.25% raise during the Great Recession, in the form of three consecutive 3.75% raises.

It included the following (and other) terms:

  1. Three-year term, commencing on July 1, 2008, and ending on September 30, 2011.
  2. A 3.75% salary increase for Firefighters, Fire Engineers, and Fire Captains, retroactively effective October 14, 2008.
  3. A 3.75% salary increase for Firefighters, Fire Engineers, and Fire Captains, effective July 1, 2009.
  4. A 3.75% salary increase for Firefighters, Fire Engineers, and Fire Captains, effective July 1, 2010.


The police officers union contract MOU No. 3929 was approved at the April 7, 2009 El Segundo City Council meeting (Consent Agenda item E12), well after the 2008 recession started. Look at the agenda item (E12) in the Agenda Packet to see the MOU. It covers the Police Officer and Police Sergeant ranks (the two lowest ranks).

It provided a 15% raise during the Great Recession, in the form of three consecutive 5% raises.

It included the following (and other) terms:

  1. Three-year term, commencing on July 1, 2008, and ending on September 30, 2011.
  2. A 5% salary increase for Police Officers and Police Sergeants, retroactively effective October 14, 2008.
  3. A 5% salary increase for Police Officers and Police Sergeants, effective July 1, 2009.
  4. A 5% salary increase for Police Officers and Police Sergeants, effective July 1, 2010.


The Police Managers union contract MOU No. ____ was approved at the April 7, 2009 El Segundo City Council meeting (Consent Agenda item E8), well after the 2008 recession started. Look at the agenda item (E8) in the Agenda Packet to see the MOU. It covers the Police Lieutenant and Police Captain ranks.

It provided an 18% raise for Police Lieutenants and a 23% raise for Police Captains during the Great Recession, in the form of four consecutive raises effective retroactively on July 1, 2008 and October 1, 2008, and also on October 1, 2009 and October 1, 2010. (ARTICLE 2 SALARY, Section 2.01 Base Salary, Agenda Packet page 75)

It included the following (and other) terms:

  1. A 4% salary increase for Police Lieutenants and Police Captains, retroactively effective July 1, 2008. (ARTICLE 2 SALARY, Section 2.01 Base Salary, Agenda Packet page 75, MOU page 3)
  2. A 9% salary increase for Police Captains and a 4% salary increase for Police Lieutenants, retroactively effective October 1, 2008. (ARTICLE 2 SALARY, Section 2.01 Base Salary, Agenda Packet page 75, MOU page 3)
  3. A 5% salary increase for Police Lieutenants and Police Captains, effective October 1, 2009. (ARTICLE 2 SALARY, Section 2.01 Base Salary, Agenda Packet page 75, MOU page 3)
  4. A 5% salary increase for Police Lieutenants and Police Captains, effective October 1, 2010. (ARTICLE 2 SALARY, Section 2.01 Base Salary, Agenda Packet page 75, MOU page 3)


December 2, 2008 El Segundo City Council Resolution-Management Raises (0.98 MB PDF file)

The City Council resolution providing Executive Management, Mid-Management/Confidential, and Public Safety Management city employee raises and benefits increases was approved at the December 2, 2008 El Segundo City Council meeting (Consent Agenda item E8), well after the 2008 Great Recession started. Look at the agenda item (E8) in the Agenda Packet to see the Resolution approving the raises. It covers the Battalion Chief, Deputy Fire Chief, Fire Chief, and Police Chief ranks, which are all management ranks).

It provided substantial raises to prevent salary compaction between management employees and their subordinate union member employees who received large pay increases. Thus, large union employee raises are used as justification for large management employee raises.

It included the following (and other) terms:

  1. Salary Compaction (Compression) in the Police and Fire Departments


    In order to address salary compaction (compression) issues between management job classifications and (labor union) bargaining unit job classifications, the following salary increases establish 5% compensation differentials
    between supervisors and subordinates
    , and result in the Police chief and Fire Chief being assigned to the same salary range. Salary Compaction Pay Adjustments, with the exception of the Fire Chief, effective July 1, 2008, will be effective October 1, 2008. The percentage increases listed below include the 4% salary increase provided to all Management/Confidential Employees.

    1. An increase of 16.9% to the Salary Range for Battalion Chief (Salary Range 60f).
    2. An increase of 14.9% to the Salary Range for Deputy Fire Chief (Salary Range 69f).
    3. An increase of 32.3% to the Salary Range for Fire Chief (Salary Range 70f).
    4. An increase of 23% to the Salary Range for Police Chief (Salary Range 60p).

      PAY – LEAVE PAYOUT – PENSION SPIKE:

      Police Chief David Cummings received a 23% pay increase effective October 1, 2008, which spiked his pay, his vacation and sick leave payout (cash-out) value (for his vacation and sick leave hours which were accrued, accumulated, and rolled-over from year to year), and his pension. His total 2009 earnings was $425,775 – consisting of $225,627 Regular Earnings, $480 Special Compensation, and $199,668 Leave Payout. He retired in 2009 with a pension of $210,213.36 yearly ($17,517.78 monthly) according to CaliforniaPensionReform.com, plus medical insurance, for the rest of his life.

      The reason given for his 23% pay increase that spiked his pay, leave payout, and pension was salary compaction, also known as salary compression, caused by (large) pay increases given to the police union members.

  2. A 4.0% salary increase for all Executive Management, Mid-Management/Confidential Employees, with the exception of the City Manager, effective 7/5/2008.

    For reference purposes, the Consumer Price Index (CPI-U) for the Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County area averaged 3.52% for the twelve month period from July 2007 – June 2008.


The following are key detailed provisions of the MOUs.


April 7. 2009 El Segundo Firefighters Union IAFF Local 3682 and El Segundo Police Union Contract Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) labor agreement contract documents (2.08 MB PDF file)


The firefighters union contract MOU No. 3928 was approved at the April 7, 2009 El Segundo City Council meeting (Consent Agenda item E11), well after the 2008 recession started. Look at the agenda item (E11) in the Agenda Packet to see the MOU. It covers the Firefighter, Fire Paramedic, Fire Engineer, and Fire Captain ranks (but not the Battalion Chief, Deputy Fire Chief, and Fire Chief ranks, which are management ranks).

It provided an 11.25% raise during the Great Recession, in the form of three consecutive 3.75% raises.

It included the following (and other) terms:

  1. Three-year term, commencing on July 1, 2008, and ending on September 30, 2011.
  2. A 3.75% salary increase for Firefighters, Fire Engineers, and Fire Captains, retroactively effective October 14, 2008.
  3. A 3.75% salary increase for Firefighters, Fire Engineers, and Fire Captains, effective July 1, 2009.
  4. A 3.75% salary increase for Firefighters, Fire Engineers, and Fire Captains, effective July 1, 2010.
  5. Provision that the maximum future City contribution for medical insurance, for both active employees and retirees, shall be $1,800 per month.
  6. Amendment to the City’s contract with PERS to provide Section 21548, “Pre-Retirement Option 2W Death Benefit”.
  7. JOB SECURITY AND LAYOFFS BASED ON SENIORITY, NOT JOB PERFORMANCE AND COST TO EMPLOYER: Permanent employees shall be laid off in the order of seniority in City service, that is the employee with the least City service shall be laid off first, followed by the employee with the second least seniority in City service, etc. Seniority shall be determined by hire date. (MOU Page 32, ARTICLE 22 – POLICY AND PROCEDURE AGREEMENTS, Section 22.08 LAYOFF AND RECALL POLICY, paragraph 6. a.)
  8. RANK FOR RANK REHIRE POLICY TO FILL TEMPORARY VACANCIES: The City shall use a rank-for-rank rehire policy to fill temporary vacancies resulting from vacation and sick leave, etc. if there is available for rehire a firefighter holding the same rank as the absent firefighter.

    The rank-for-rank rehire scheme is a form of union abuse used to drive up overtime hours and compensation costs, especially when firefighters game the system by scheduling vacation and sick leave to maximize the overtime hours and pay for each other.

    It prevents the City from rehiring a less expensive firefighter who is trained and qualified to a hire rank but not promoted to that rank due to lack of an available position. There was a fraud investigation for this type of abuse by Clark County, Nevada firefighters.

    (MOU Page 31, ARTICLE 22 – POLICY AND PROCEDURE AGREEMENTS, Section 22.06 RANK FOR RANK POLICY, paragraph 1.)

  9. UNION DOUBLE-COMPENSATION PROVISION: $600 per year ($50 per month) additional Premium Pay (“Special Compensation”) for having a Class A California Driver License to drive the fire engine and fire truck, which is already an existing job duty in the job description of Fire Engineers for which Fire Engineers are given a higher base salary when they are promoted from Firefighter to Fire Engineer. The City shall provide (and pay for) the training and the means to obtain this Drivers License or else the City shall pay the Premium Pay without the employee obtaining the Drivers License. (MOU Pages 8-9, ARTICLE 3 – INCENTIVE COMPENSATION, Section 3.08 CLASS “A” DRIVER’S LICENSE PREMIUM PAY, paragraphs 1 and 2.)
  10. UNION DOUBLE-COMPENSATION PROVISION: Provision that effective October 14, 2008, firefighters get $600 per year ($50 per month) additional Premium Pay (“Special Compensation”) for having a Commercial Class B Restricted California Driver’s License, firefighters restricted noncommercial Class “B” Driver’s License, or equivalent (and/or? possessing a valid EMT-D certification or Los Angeles County Paramedic Accreditation – the MOU contract wording is not clear). (MOU Page 10, ARTICLE 4 – EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS, Section 4.01 INCENTIVE PAY, paragraph 1.)
  11. UNION NON-JOB-RELATED COMPENSATION PROVISION: Provision that effective October 14, 2008 a Bachelor’s college degree or a Master’s college degree in Political Science shall be eligible for additional reimbursement for tuition and books and for educational incentive compensation. Thus, the City’s taxpayers pay extra “special compensation” to firefighters who get a college degree in political science to learn how to better campaign to elect the City Council candidates who will give them the biggest salary, benefits, and pension increases. (MOU Page 10, ARTICLE 4 – EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS, Section 4.01 INCENTIVE PAY, paragraphs 2. c. and 2. d.; and MOU Pages 24-25, ARTICLE 18 – EDUCATIONAL REIMBURSEMENT, Section 18.01 REIMBURSEMENT FOR COURSES, and Section 18.02 REIMBURSEMENT FOR TUITION AND BOOKS.)
  12. UNION FEATHERBEDDING PROVISION: Members will perform touch-up painting (small jobs handled with 1″ brush and quart can). Such touch-up painting shall exclude painting of entire walls, rooms, or structures. (MOU Page 27, ARTICLE 20 – MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS, Section 20.01 LIMITED MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR, paragraph 2.)
  13. UNION FEATHERBEDDING PROVISION: Members will perform minor, unskilled carpentry maintenance and repair. Such carpentry responsibilities shall not include maintenance or repairs requiring special skills, knowledge, or tools beyond household handyman level.(MOU Page 27, ARTICLE 20 – MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS, Section 20.01 LIMITED MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR, paragraph 1.)


The police officers union contract MOU No. 3929 was approved at the April 7, 2009 El Segundo City Council meeting (Consent Agenda item E12), well after the 2008 recession started. Look at the agenda item (E12) in the Agenda Packet to see the MOU. It covers the Police Officer and Police Sergeant ranks (the two lowest ranks).

It provided a 15% raise during the Great Recession, in the form of three consecutive 5% raises.

It included the following (and other) terms:

  1. Three-year term, commencing on July 1, 2008, and ending on September 30, 2011.
  2. A 5% salary increase for Police Officers and Police Sergeants, retroactively effective October 14, 2008.
  3. A 5% salary increase for Police Officers and Police Sergeants, effective July 1, 2009.
  4. A 5% salary increase for Police Officers and Police Sergeants, effective July 1, 2010.
  5. Provision that the maximum future City contribution for medical insurance, for both active employees and retirees, shall be $1,800 per month.
  6. PERS Retirement Formula – The City has implemented the 3% at 50 PERS retirement formula for all affected employees. Thus, police union members can retire at age 50 with up to 90% of their single highest pay year as their annual pension for the rest of their lives (3% per year of service) (ARTICLE 18 RETIREMENT BENEFITS, Section 18.01 PERS Retirement Formula).
  7. PERS Pickup Reported as “Compensation Earnable” – The City shall pay on behalf of each employee his or her required 9% “employee contribution” to CalPERS. Additionally, the City shall report a set dollar amount equal to the nine percent (9%) “employee contribution” to the California Public Employees’ Retirement System as compensation earnable. Said contributions will be paid on holiday pay received by eligible employees. (ARTICLE 18 RETIREMENT BENEFITS, Section 18.02 PERS Pickup Reported as “Compensation Earnable”)
  8. Include Optional PERS Contract Provisions -
    A. The City shall provide “Level 4″ 1959 Survivors Benefits.
    B. As soon as practicable, the City shall modify its PERS contract to provide for the Government Code section 21548 PRE-RETIREMENT OPTION 2W DEATH BENEFIT.
    C. The City shall provide the Single Highest Year formula.
    (ARTICLE 18 RETIREMENT BENEFITS, Section 18.03, Optional Contract Provisions)
  9. Minimum Service with City of El Segundo to Receive Retirement Benefits – Employees who retire must have been employed for a minimum of five (5) years with the City of El Segundo as a peace officer to receive the following benefits: pay for unused sick leave balance; the option of continuing to participate in the City’s group insurance programs; and the right to receive a contribution toward medical insurance for the retiree and 1 dependent. (ARTICLE 18 RETIREMENT BENEFITS, Section 18.04 Minimum Service with City of El Segundo to Receive Retirement Benefits)
  10. Retiree Health Insurance Contribution Program – The City will contribute to a retiree health insurance contribution program for retirees who participate in the Public Employees’ medical and Hospital Care Program. The program will provide for the following maximum contribution: The Average monthly dollar cost of the premium for an employee and 2 or more dependents for the HMO’s available to employees under PEMHCA. (ARTICLE 18 RETIREMENT BENEFITS, Section 18.05 Retiree Health Insurance Contribution Program)
  11. Longevity Pay – Police union members who have satisfactory performance appraisals are given additional “longevity” pay based on their number of years of service, in accordance with Salary Schedule 2. (Section 3.03 Longevity Achievement on Merit)
  12. Overtime Pay – Overtime hours are compensated at one and one-half times their regular rate of pay. (ARTICLE 7 OVERTIME COMPENSATION)
  13. On-Call Pay – Off duty police union members who are placed in on-call status for court during either the morning or afternoon session receive 3 hours of paid overtime, and 6 hours of paid overtime if placed in on-call status for court during both the morning and afternoon session. (Section 7.02 Court On-Call Pay)
  14. Call Backs – A minimum of 4 hours of work time at one and one-half the employee’s regular rate of pay is credited for all police union member call backs. (Section 7.03)
  15. Holiday Pay – Police union members who regularly work holidays are credited 120 hours (15 days) of paid holiday leave in their holiday bank. (ARTICLE 11 HOLIDAY PAY, Section 11.01)
  16. Spanish Pay – Police union members who speak Spanish (or another language designated by the Police Chief) fluently are paid premium compensation of $3,406.80 (Police Officer) or $4,267.92 (Sergeant) yearly ($283.90 or $355.66 monthly). (Section 8.04)
  17. Motorcycle Cleaning and Maintenance Pay – Police union members assigned to motorcycle duty are paid an additional $6,132.12 (Police Officer) or $7,682.28 (Sergeant) yearly stipend for off-duty time spent cleaning
    and maintaining their motorcycles ($511.01 or $640.19 monthly). (ARTICLE 8 DIFFERENTIAL PAY, Section 8.01)
  18. Uniform Cleaning Allowance – The City shall provide required uniforms and safety equipment to eligible employees. Employees eligible for a uniform cleaning allowance shall receive $715.00 per year. (ARTICLE 17 UNIFORM AND SAFETY EQUIPMENT ALLOWANCE, Section 17.01 Provision & Annual Allowance)
  19. $4,000 Interest-Free Computer Loan – All participants in the loan program will be eligible for an initial, interest free loan in the amount of $4,000 (four thousand dollars). (ARTICLE 20 COMPUTER LOAN PROGRAM, Section 20.01 Initial Loan)


The Police Managers union contract MOU No. ____ was approved at the April 7, 2009 El Segundo City Council meeting (Consent Agenda item E8), well after the 2008 recession started. Look at the agenda item (E8) in the Agenda Packet to see the MOU. It covers the Police Lieutenant and Police Captain ranks.

It provided an 18% raise for Police Lieutenants and a 23% raise for Police Captains during the Great Recession, in the form of four consecutive raises effective retroactively on July 1, 2008 and October 1, 2008, and also on October 1, 2009 and October 1, 2010. (ARTICLE 2 SALARY, Section 2.01 Base Salary, Agenda Packet page 75)

It included the following (and other) terms:

  1. A 4% salary increase for Police Lieutenants and Police Captains, retroactively effective July 1, 2008. (ARTICLE 2 SALARY, Section 2.01 Base Salary, Agenda Packet page 75, MOU page 3)
  2. A 9% salary increase for Police Captains and a 4% salary increase for Police Lieutenants, retroactively effective October 1, 2008. (ARTICLE 2 SALARY, Section 2.01 Base Salary, Agenda Packet page 75, MOU page 3)
  3. A 5% salary increase for Police Lieutenants and Police Captains, effective October 1, 2009. (ARTICLE 2 SALARY, Section 2.01 Base Salary, Agenda Packet page 75, MOU page 3)
  4. A 5% salary increase for Police Lieutenants and Police Captains, effective October 1, 2010. (ARTICLE 2 SALARY, Section 2.01 Base Salary, Agenda Packet page 75, MOU page 3)
  5. 3% @ 50 CalPERS Retirement Formula – The City has implemented the 3% at 50 PERS retirement formula for all affected employees. Thus, police union members can retire at age 50 with up to 90% of their single highest pay year as their annual pension for the rest of their lives (3% per year of service). (ARTICLE 22 RETIREMENT BENEFITS, Section 22.01 PERS Retirement Formula, Agenda Packet page 87, MOU page 15)
  6. City pays employee’s required nine percent (9%) CalPERS pension “Employee Contribution” and reports that amount of money to CalPERS as compensation earnable for pension credit as though it were employee income. (ARTICLE 22 RETIREMENT BENEFITS, Section 22.02 PERS Pickup Reported as “Compensation Earnable”, Agenda Packet page 87, MOU page 15)
  7. City pays the CalPERS pension “Employer Contribution” on the amount of the required nine percent (9%) CalPERS retirement “Employee Contribution” and reports such contribution as an item of special compensation. (ARTICLE 22 RETIREMENT BENEFITS, Section 22.03 Monetary Value of Employer-Paid Member Contributions (EPMC), Agenda Packet page 87, MOU page 15)
  8. City provides “Level 4″ 1959 Survivors Benefits. (ARTICLE 22 RETIREMENT BENEFITS, Section 22.04 Optional Contract Provisions, Agenda Packet page 87, MOU page 15)
  9. City provides the Single Highest Year formula, i.e., the employee will have the 3% at 50 CalPERS pension benefit formula where the employee will receive an annual pension benefit of up to 90% of the Single Highest Year income (3% of the single highest year income per year of service) as early as age 50. (ARTICLE 22 RETIREMENT BENEFITS, Section 22.04 Optional Contract Provisions, Agenda Packet page 87, MOU page 15)
  10. City provides the Military Service credit as public service option. (ARTICLE 22 RETIREMENT BENEFITS,
    Section 22.04 Optional Contract Provisions, Agenda Packet page 87, MOU page 15)
  11. City started providing the additional PERS Section 21548, “Pre-Retirement Option 2W Death Benefit”

    . (ARTICLE 22 RETIREMENT BENEFITS, Section 22.04 Optional Contract Provisions, Agenda Packet page 87, MOU page 15)

  12. City will contribute to a retiree health insurance contribution program for retirees in the Public Employees' Medical and Hospital Care Program. (ARTICLE 22 RETIREMENT BENEFITS, Section 22.05 Retiree Health Insurance Contribution Program, Agenda Packet page 88, MOU page 16)
  13. 457 Deferred Compensation Plan has been established as a benefit for employee participation. (ARTICLE 25 DEFERRED COMPENSATION, Section 25.01 Deferred Compensation Plan (457), Agenda Packet page 88, MOU page 16)
  14. 401a Deferred Compensation Plan (match up to 1% of total pay) - City will pay an amount equal to the employee's contribution to deferred compensation up to a maximum of one percent (1%) of the employee's total pay. (ARTICLE 25 DEFERRED COMPENSATION, Section 25.02 Deferred Compensation Plan (401a), Agenda Packet page 88, MOU page 16)
  15. Maximum future City contribution for medical insurance, for both active employees and retirees, is $1,800 per month. (ARTICLE 20 HEALTH BENEFITS, Section 20.02 City Medical Contribution, Agenda Packet page 86, MOU page 14)
  16. Executive Leave days increased from five to seven; 28 hours may be carried over and accumulated from year to year, not to exceed a cap of 84 hours, and not eligible for pay out upon retirement of separation of employment. (ARTICLE 10 EXECUTIVE LEAVE, Section 10.01 Entitlement, Agenda Packet page 80, MOU page 8)
  17. A maximum accrual of 80 hours of compensatory time may be accumulated. (ARTICLE 12 COMPENSATORY TIME, Section 12.01 Maximum Accrual, Agenda Packet page 81, MOU page 9)
  18. Captains get 12 specified dates off with pay as holidays, plus one personal leave/floating holiday. (ARTICLE 13 HOLIDAY LEAVE, Section 13.01 Holiday Leave -- Captains, Section 13.02 Personal Leave/Floating Holiday -- Captains, Agenda Packet page 81-82, MOU page 9-10)
  19. Lieutenants are paid for 104 hours in lieu of holiday pay once a year on or about December 10. (ARTICLE 13 HOLIDAY LEAVE, Section 13.03 Holiday Pay -- Lieutenants, Agenda Packet page 82, MOU page 10)
  20. Vacation Days increased from a maximum number of 22 to 25 days (200 hours) per year, following completion of 14 years service.
    96 hours per year with full salary for first 5 years of continuous service with the City;
    120 hours per year with full salary after 5 years and until 10 years of continuous service;
    144 hours per year with full salary after 11 years and until the completion of 14 years of continuous service;
    200 hours per year with full salary after 14 years of continuous service.
    (ARTICLE 15 VACATION LEAVE, Section 15.02 Vacation Accrual Schedule, Agenda Packet page 84, MOU page 12)
  21. Vacation Accrual rate is based on total service time in a PERS or comparable agency after employees have successfully completed their initial probationary period and/or achieved E step placement in their assigned salary range. (ARTICLE 15 VACATION LEAVE, Section 15.03 Vacation Accrual Based on Total Service Time in a PERS or Comparable Agency, Agenda Packet page 84, MOU page 12)
  22. Payment in lieu of vacation time accrual - Employees may receive payment in lieu of accrued vacation time up to a maximum of one hundred percent (100%) the annual accrual to which they are entitled by length of service, after completing one (1) year of service. (ARTICLE 15 VACATION LEAVE, Section 15.04 Vacation Time Accrual -- Payment in Lieu Of, Agenda Packet page 84, MOU page 12)
  23. Affected employees shall accumulate sick leave at the rate of one (1) eight (8) hour day accumulation for each month's service not to exceed a maximum of 1056 hours (132 days). Hours worked in addition to a regular work week shall not entitle an employee to additional sick leave accumulation. (ARTICLE 14 SICK LEAVE, Section 14.01 Sick Leave -- Leave with Pay due to Illness, Agenda Packet page 82, MOU page 10)
  24. Effective the first day of December of each year, affected employees who maintain a balance of 1056 hours (132 days) of sick leave accrual shall be paid for seventy-five percent (75%) of the sick leave accumulated and not used during the preceding twelve-month period. Payment shall be paid at the affected employee's regular rate of pay and be paid on or before December 10. (ARTICLE 14 SICK LEAVE, Section 14.03 Sick Leave -- Payment of Seventy-Five Percent (75%) of Accrual, Agenda Packet page 82, MOU page 10)
  25. Affected employees who separate employment prior to the first day of December while maintaining a balance of more than 1056 hours (132 days) of sick leave shall be paid for seventy-five percent (75%) of their unused accrued sick leave accumulated since the preceding December 1. Payment shall be paid at the affected employee's regular rate of pay. (ARTICLE 14 SICK LEAVE, Section 14.04 Sick Leave Accrued -- Payment on Separation Prior to December 1, Agenda Packet page 83, MOU page 11)
  26. Upon separation from service because of a disability retirement, affected employees with five (5) years of City service will be compensated for one-hundred percent (100%) of the affected employee's accumulated unused sick leave at the affected employee's regular rate of pay at separation. (ARTICLE 14 SICK LEAVE, Section 14.05 Payment of Sick Leave Accrual -- Disability Retirement, Agenda Packet page 83, MOU page 11)
  27. Payment of sick leave accrual is 100% after 20 years of service - Upon separation from service, affected employees with (20) years of City service will be compensated for one-hundred percent (100%) of the employee's accumulated, unused sick leave at the affected employee's regular rate of pay at separation. (ARTICLE 14 SICK LEAVE, Section 14.06 Payment of Sick Leave Accrual -- After 20 Years of City Service, Agenda Packet page 83, MOU page 11)
  28. "Regular rate of pay" (base pay rate) is defined as the hourly rate, including all remunerations paid to or on behalf of the employee, including Educational Incentive Pay and the City paid nine-percent (9%) CalPERS pension Employer Paid Member Contribution. (ARTICLE 2 SALARY, Section 2.02 Regular Rate of pay Defined, Agenda Packet page 76, MOU page 4)
  29. Overtime Pay is paid at one and a half times their "regular rate of pay" for Police Lieutenants and at their "regular rate of pay" for Police Lieutenants. Thus, overtime pay for Lieutenants includes one and a half times the Educational Incentive Pay and the City paid nine-percent (9%) CalPERS pension Employer Paid Member Contribution. (ARTICLE 7 OVERTIME COMPENSATION, Section 7.01 Pay for Shift Schedule, Agenda Packet page 78, MOU page 6)
  30. Educational Incentive Compensation - of $10,373.22 yearly ($398.97 per (bi-weekly) pay period) for Police Lieutenants holding any Master's Degree, and $11,736.40 yearly ($451.40 per (bi-weekly) pay period) for Police Captains holding any Master's Degree, effective retroactively back to July 1, 2008. Educational Incentive Pay qualifies as compensation earnable (counts towards the employee's CalPERS pension benefit) pursuant to Section 20636 of the California Government Code and Section 571(a)(I) of the California Code of Regulations. (ARTICLE 3 EDUCATIONAL INCENTIVE PAY, Section 3.01 Educational Incentive Pay, Agenda Packet pages 76-77, MOU pages 4-5)
  31. 100% Tuition and Books Reimbursement for undergraduate studies in pursuit of an Associate's or a Bachelor's Degree at any accredited college or university having its campus in the State of California, for classes approved pre-enrollment by the Chief of Police or his/her designee, and in which the employee attains a grade of "C" or better (or a "pass" grade where classes are taken "pass/fail"). (ARTICLE 4 TUITION AND BOOK REIMBURSEMENT PROGRAM, Section 4.02 Undergraduate Studies (Studies undertaken in pursuit of an Associate's or a Bachelor's degree), Agenda Packet page 77, MOU page 5)
  32. 100% Tuition and Books Reimbursement for post-graduate studies at the University of California or California State University (80% reimbursement for studies at other accredited institutions), for classes approved pre-enrollment by the Chief of Police or his/her designee, and in which the employee attains a grade of "C" or better (or a "pass" grade where classes are taken "pass/fail"). (ARTICLE 4 TUITION AND BOOK REIMBURSEMENT PROGRAM, Section 4.03 Post-Graduate Studies (Post-Graduate studies are defined as those undertaken in pursuit of a degree beyond a Bachelor's), Agenda Packet page 77, MOU page 5)
  33. Uniform Allowance - $53 per month of active duty for patrol lieutenants, $40 per month of active duty for non-patrol lieutenants and captains. The Uniform Allowance qualifies as compensation earnable towards the CalPERS pension benefit pursuant to California Government Code Section 20636 and California Code of Regulations Section 571(a)(1). (ARTICLE 21 UNIFORMS AND SAFETY EQUIPMENT, Section 21.02 Uniform Allowance, Agenda Packet page 87, MOU page 15)
  34. Physical fitness assessment is voluntary. (ARTICLE 8 PHYSICAL FITNESS INCENTIVE PROGRAM, Section 8.03 Program Components, B. Fitness Assessment, Agenda Packet page 79, MOU page 7)
  35. Physical Fitness Incentive Program Pay per quarter of 16 hours ("Excellent" condition), 8 hours ("Good" condition), and 4 hours ("Fair" condition), where the pay qualifies as compensation earnable towards CalPERS pension benefit credit pursuant to California Government Code Section 20636 and California Code of Regulations Section 571(a)(1). (ARTICLE 8 PHYSICAL FITNESS INCENTIVE PROGRAM, Section 8.04 Physical Fitness Incentive Program Pay, Agenda Packet page 80, MOU page 8)
  36. Fully paid annual comprehensive medical exam.
  37. Fully paid dental, optical, and life insurance premiums for the employee and eligible dependents. The City shall make available any city-wide improvements to the dental benefit, to the Association. (ARTICLE 20 HEALTH BENEFITS, Section 20.03 Optical, Dental, and Life Insurance, Agenda Packet page 86, MOU page 14)
  38. $4,000 Interest-Free Three (3) Year Computer Loan to purchase personal computer hardware and software. (ARTICLE 24 COMPUTER LOAN PROGRAM, Section 24.01 Initial Loan, Agenda Packet page 88, MOU page 16)
  39. Employee layoffs are based on seniority, and not on job performance unless there is a tie in seniority (same hire date), making it difficult to improve the employee staff during layoffs by laying off incompetent and dishonest employees first.

    A permanent employee in a classification affected by a reduction in force shall be laid off based on seniority in City service that is the employee with the least service shall be laid off first, followed by the employee with the second lease City service, etc. Seniority shall be determined by hire date. City seniority shall be used to effectuate the procedures set forth in this Article. Seniority for part-time employees shall be calculated as one-half (1/2) time from the date of hire with the City. (ARTICLE 27 LAYOFF PROCEDURES, Section 27.04 Procedures for Layoff, Agenda Packet page 90, MOU page 18)

  40. Ties in layoffs between employees with same hire date (equal seniority) are broken based on job performance.

    In cases where two (2) or more employees have the same date of hire (i.e. equal seniority), retention points for job performance shall be credited on the basis of the average of the overall evaluation for the last three (3) years, provided the last rating had been filed more than (30) days prior to the date of the layoff notice. Retention points are as follows:

    Exceeds Standard - 24 points
    Meets Standard - 12 points
    Below Standard - 0 points

    In the event of a tie in seniority, the employee with the lowest average of retention points shall be laid off first. In the event that one or more of the affected employees do not have overall evaluation ratings for the last three (3) years on file, ties shall be broken by a coin toss.
    (ARTICLE 27 LAYOFF PROCEDURES, Section 27.05 Breaking Ties, Agenda Packet page 90, MOU page 18)

  41. Assignment of employees to lower vacant positions in lieu of layoff will be based on seniority and not on job performance, unless there is a tie in seniority (same hire date).

    An employee designated for layoff as a result of abolition of a position or classification may be offered appointment to a vacant position in a lower classification, if the employee is qualified by education and/or experience for such position. If there is more than one qualified employee to be offered such appointment(s), the offer(s) shall be based on seniority, etc. If the employees have the same seniority, then the procedure for breaking ties set forth above shall apply. An employee accepting such appointment shall be placed on the step for the lower classification most closely corresponding, but in no case higher, than the salary step of his/her previously held position, and the employee will be assigned a new salary anniversary date on the effective date of the appointment. (ARTICLE 27 LAYOFF PROCEDURES, Section 27.06 Reduction to a Vacant Position, Agenda Packet page 90, MOU page 18)

  42. Displacement (Bumping) Rights based on seniority, not job performance -

    A. An employee designated for layoff as a result of abolition of a position or classification may displace ("bump") an employee in a lower classification in which the employee has prior service, provided the laid off employee has greater seniority than the employee in the lower classification.

    B. An employee designated for layoff with greater seniority may displace ("bump") a less senior employee in a lower classification, for which he/she is immediately qualified to perform.

    (ARTICLE 27 LAYOFF PROCEDURES, Section 27.07 Displacement Rights, Agenda Packet page 90, MOU page 18)


Here is the City Council Meeting Agenda Packet staff report, with annotations by Mike Robbins from the Public Safety Project shown within parenthesis and in (bold italic type).

April 7, 2009 El Segundo City Council Meeting

Consent Agenda item E8:

( Agenda Packet PDF file and stamped page numbers 65 to 66: )

EL SEGUNDO CITY COUNCIL                             MEETING DATE: April 7, 2009
AGENDA STATEMENT                             AGENDA HEADING: Consent Agenda

AGENDA DESCRIPTION

Consideration and possible action regarding approval of a comprehensive three-year Memorandum of Understanding (Labor Agreement) between the city of El Segundo and the El Segundo Police Managers' Association. (Fiscal Impact: $161,810 salary and benefit increases; plus $68,881 to resolve salary compaction in the Police Department, for a grand total of $230,691.)

RECOMMENDED COUNCIL ACTION:

  1. Approve the Comprehensive Memorandum of Understanding.
  2. Authorize the Mayor to execute the Memorandum of Understanding in a form approved by the City Attorney.
  3. Alternatively, discuss and take other action related to this item.

ATTACHED SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS:

  1. Comprehensive Memorandum of Understanding.

FISCAL IMPACT: ($230,691)

      Amount Budgeted: $161,810
      Additional Appropriation: $68,881
      Account Number(s):

ORIGINATED BY: Bob Hyland, Director of Human Resources
REVIEWED BY: Bill Crowe, Assistant City Manager
APPROVED BY: Jack Wayt, City Manager

BACKGROUND AND DISCUSSION:

In July 2008, staff and representatives of the El Segundo Police Managers' Association began meeting and conferring, pursuant to Sections 3500 et. seq. of the California Government Code, for the purposes of obtaining a labor agreement. Agreement was reached during the second week of December, 2008. On December 16, 2008, Council approved an Agreement between the city and the Association and adopted a Resolution approving the Memorandum of Understanding.

Council's action approved the changes in the terms and conditions of employment detailed in the Agreement, with the understanding that those changes shall then be incorporated into a Comprehensive Memorandum of Understanding which in itself would then be presented to the Council for approval.

The Agreement contains the following major provisions:

  1. Three-year term, commencing on July 1, 2008 and ending on September 30, 2011.
  2. A 4% salary increase for Police Lieutenants and Police Captains, effective (retroactively back to) July 5, 2008.
  3. In order to address salary compaction issues between Management Job Classifications and Bargaining Unit Job Classifications, the following salary increases establish 5% compensation differentials between supervisors and subordinates:

    • Lieutenant, 4% salary increase, effective (retroactively back to) October 1, 2008; and
    • Police Captain, 9% salary increase, effective (retroactively back to) October 1, 2008.
  4. Effective 10/1/2009 and 10/1/2010, an (5%) increase in compensation reportable to the Public Employment Retirement System (PERS) equivalent to that received by the El Segundo Police Officers Association. (NOTE: This agenda packet staff report omitted the 5%, concealing these two 5% raises and the total raise in this agenda item description. It was necessary to read the MOU to find this information.)
  5. An increase in additional pay from $800 per month to $1,200. This compensation is used principally for the purchase of PERS medical insurance, was last increased July, 2003 and will be equivalent to that received by the City's unrepresented Management-Confidential Employees.
  6. Effective 10/1/2009 and 10/1/2010, an (TBD%) increase in additional pay reportable to PERS equivalent to that received by Management-Confidential Employees. (NOTE: This agenda packet staff report omitted the TBD%, concealing these two TBD% raises and the total raise in this agenda item description. It was necessary to read the MOU to find this information.)
  7. Conversion of 8% Masters Degree pay to an equivalent flat dollar amount.
  8. Provision that the maximum future City contribution for medical insurance, for both active employees and retirees, shall be $1,800 per month.
  9. Acceptance of the revised City of El Segundo Substance Abuse Policy and Drug-Free Workplace Statement, dated July 1, 2008.
  10. Amendment to the City's contract with PERS to provide Section 21548, "Pre-Retirement Option 2W Death Benefit."
  11. An increase in Executive Leave days from five to seven.
  12. An increase in the maximum number of Vacation Days, following completion of 14 years service, from 22 days to 25 per year.
  13. Physical fitness assessment is voluntary.
  14. An agreement between the City and the Association to amend the Memorandum of Understanding to contain all rules, regulations, policies and procedures currently in effect that relate wages, hours, benefits and working conditions.


December 2, 2008 El Segundo City Council Resolution-Management Raises (0.98 MB PDF file)

The City Council resolution providing Executive Management, Mid-Management/Confidential, and Public Safety Management city employee raises and benefits increases was approved at the December 2, 2008 El Segundo City Council meeting (Consent Agenda item E8), well after the 2008 Great Recession started. Look at the agenda item (E8) in the Agenda Packet to see the Resolution approving the raises. It covers the Battalion Chief, Deputy Fire Chief, Fire Chief, and Police Chief ranks, which are all management ranks).

It provided substantial raises to prevent salary compaction between management employees and their subordinate union member employees who received large pay increases. Thus, large union employee raises are used as justification for large management employee raises.

It included the following (and other) terms:

  1. Salary Compaction (Compression) in the Police and Fire Departments


    In order to address salary compaction (compression) issues between management job classifications and (labor union) bargaining unit job classifications, the following salary increases establish 5% compensation differentials
    between supervisors and subordinates
    , and result in the Police chief and Fire Chief being assigned to the same salary range. Salary Compaction Pay Adjustments, with the exception of the Fire Chief, effective July 1, 2008, will be effective October 1, 2008. The percentage increases listed below include the 4% salary increase provided to all Management/Confidential Employees.

    1. An increase of 16.9% to the Salary Range for Battalion Chief (Salary Range 60f).
    2. An increase of 14.9% to the Salary Range for Deputy Fire Chief (Salary Range 69f).
    3. An increase of 32.3% to the Salary Range for Fire Chief (Salary Range 70f).
    4. An increase of 23% to the Salary Range for Police Chief (Salary Range 60p).

      PAY - LEAVE PAYOUT - PENSION SPIKE:

      Police Chief David Cummings received a 23% pay increase effective October 1, 2008, which spiked his pay, his vacation and sick leave payout (cash-out) value (for his vacation and sick leave hours which were accrued, accumulated, and rolled-over from year to year), and his pension. His total 2009 earnings was $425,775 - consisting of $225,627 Regular Earnings, $480 Special Compensation, and $199,668 Leave Payout. He retired in 2009 with a pension of $210,213.36 yearly ($17,517.78 monthly) according to CaliforniaPensionReform.com, plus medical insurance, for the rest of his life.

      The reason given for his 23% pay increase that spiked his pay, leave payout, and pension was salary compaction, also known as salary compression, caused by (large) pay increases given to the police union members.

  2. Amendment to the City's contract with the California Public Employees Retirement System (PERS) to provide Section 21548 (Pre-Retirement Option 2W Death Benefit) for the Police Chief, Fire Chief, Deputy Fire Chief and Battalion Chiefs. This benefit provides the Retirement-Eligible Employees' spouse a monthly allowance equal to the highest possible allowance the employee would have been eligible to receive at the time of their death. This benefit has been available to the City's civilian, non-safety employees since April, 2008.
  3. A 4.0% salary increase for all Executive Management, Mid-Management/Confidential Employees, with the exception of the City Manager, effective 7/5/2008.

    For reference purposes, the Consumer Price Index (CPI-U) for the Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County area averaged 3.52% for the twelve month period from July 2007 - June 2008.

  4. An increase in additional pay from $1,000 per month to $1,200 per month. This compensation is used principally for the purchase of PERS Medical Insurance and was last increased in July, 2004, from $900 to $1,000.
  5. An increase in Executive Leave Days for Department Head Employees, from eight days to ten days per year.
  6. An increase in Executive Leave Days for Mid-Management/Confidential Employees from five days to seven days per year.
  7. An increase in the maximum number of Vacation Days, following completion of 14 years service, from 22 days to 25 days per year.
  8. Updated language regarding Jury Duty Service, providing for two weeks paid Jury Duty Service, and a variety of new Administrative Procedures.
  9. Provision that the maximum future City contribution for medical insurance, for both active employees and retirees, shall be $1,800 per month.


Posted in California, El Segundo, El Segundo Election Coverage, El Segundo News, El Segundo Tax and Fee Increases, Elections, Firefighter Union Corruption, News, Police Union Corruption, Political Corruption, Politics, Union Corruption | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

April 15 Council Meeting – Letter to the El Segundo Herald by Mike Robbins

The following letter to the editor was published in the El Segundo Herald newspaper (HeraldPublications.com) on Thursday, May 1, 2014 in the Letters section on page 16. The El Segundo Herald has a strict 250-word limit, including the title.


April 15 Council Meeting

The Council meeting after the election should have been a straightforward ceremonial passing of power from the old to the new Council. However, defeated Mayor Bill Fisher made the meeting all about himself, and then his ally, Marie Fellhauer, made it all about attacking newly elected Council Members Suzanne Fuentes and Mike Dugan.

Fisher used his bully pulpit for the last time. He gave a long-winded speech repeating his campaign material, taking credit for the work and accomplishments of others including Carl Jacobson and even myself. As usual, he stated numerous falsehoods, and without any proof or evidence, accused others of lying even though they backed up their statements with evidence.

Police Union member Marie Fellhauer put an item on the agenda designed to achieve a political end. It read, “Consideration and possible action to discuss the salary and benefits that the City Council members receive and whether such should be reduced or eliminated either voluntarily or through formal action.”

Eliminating Council pay and benefits will make it difficult to attract honest, competent, independent candidates. This will help the Police and Fire Unions elect their own candidates and pack the Council with Union Puppets. It will also help Fellhauer and Atkinson run for re-election with minimal or no competition.

The election might be canceled due to lack of candidates, as in 2006, when Fisher was appointed after potential candidates were intimidated by the unprecedented 2004 campaign spending. It would’ve happened this time, if not for Dugan.

– Mike Robbins


Posted in California, El Segundo, El Segundo Election Coverage, El Segundo Herald Letters, El Segundo Tax and Fee Increases, Elections, Firefighter and Police Union Compensation and Pensions, Firefighter Union Corruption, Government Employee Compensation and Pensions, Letters to the Editor, Measure A - 5 New Taxes and 6 Tax Inceases, Police Union Corruption, Political Corruption, Politics, Union Corruption | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Post-election Council meeting – Letter to The Beach Reporter by Michael Robbins

The following letter to the editor was published in The Beach Reporter newspaper (TBRnews.com) on Thursday, April 24, 2014 in the Letters section. The Beach Reporter has a 250-word limit for letters excluding the title.


Post-election Council meeting

The El Segundo Council meeting after the election should have been a straightforward ceremonial passing of power from the old to the new Council. However, defeated Mayor Bill Fisher made the meeting all about himself, and then his ally, Marie Fellhauer, made it all about attacking newly elected Council members, Suzanne Fuentes and Mike Dugan.

Fisher used his bully pulpit for the last time. He gave a long-winded speech repeating his campaign material, taking credit for the work and accomplishments of others including Carl Jacobson and even myself. As usual, he stated numerous falsehoods and, without any proof, accused others of lying even though they backed up their statements with evidence.

Police union member Marie Fellhauer put an item on the agenda designed to achieve a political end. It read, “Consideration and possible action to discuss the salary and benefits that the City Council members receive and whether such should be reduced or eliminated either voluntarily or through formal action.”

Eliminating Council pay and benefits will make it difficult to attract honest, competent, independent candidates. This will help the police and fire unions elect their own candidates and pack the Council with union puppets. It will also help Fellhauer and Atkinson run for re-election with minimal or no competition.

The election might be canceled due to a lack of candidates, as in 2006, when Fisher was appointed after potential candidates were intimidated by the unprecedented 2004 union and special interest campaign spending. It would have happened this time, if not for Dugan.

Michael Robbins
El Segundo


Posted in Beach Reporter Letters, California, El Segundo, El Segundo Election Coverage, El Segundo News, El Segundo Tax and Fee Increases, Elections, Firefighter and Police Union Compensation and Pensions, Firefighter Union Corruption, Government Employee Compensation and Pensions, Letters to the Editor, News, Police Union Corruption, Political Corruption, Politics, Tax Policy and Issues, Union Corruption | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Council pay procedures – Letter to The Beach Reporter by Marianne Fong

The following letter to the editor was published in The Beach Reporter newspaper (TBRnews.com) on Thursday, April 24, 2014 in the Letters section. The Beach Reporter has a 250-word limit for letters excluding the title.


Council pay procedures

Marie Fellhauer ruined the April 15 El Segundo City Council meeting, which was supposed to be a peaceful transition for the newly elected Council. She put an item on the agenda to eliminate pay and benefits for elected Council members, but interestingly, not for the elected city clerk and treasurer who are paid significantly more.

Fellhauer falsely claimed the Council cannot cut union salaries and compensation and, therefore, Council member pay and benefits should be eliminated. Obviously, her real agenda is to punish newly elected Council members who support union compensation and pension reforms necessary to keep our city solvent and viable. Fellhauer is angry and vindictive because she lost her Council majority when Fisher lost the election.

Fellhauer demanded Suzanne Fuentes and Mike Dugan give up their $900 per month City Council pay and benefits if she gives up hers. She neglected to mention she is a highly paid police union member in Los Angeles with a lavish pension and benefits, and a cushy desk job, all at taxpayer expense.

El Segundo City Council pay is low. We are fortunate to have Suzanne Fuentes and Mike Dugan on Council. Both are experienced managers from major corporations. It is the overpaid police and fire unions that are causing serious financial problems, not City Council pay.

Fellhauer wants to punish honest, independent, more qualified Council members. Clearly, the police and fire union members who don’t even live in town have a representative in Marie Fellhauer, but the residents and taxpayers do not.

Marianne Fong
El Segundo


Posted in Beach Reporter Letters, California, El Segundo, El Segundo Election Coverage, El Segundo News, Elections, Firefighter and Police Union Compensation and Pensions, Firefighter Union Corruption, Government Employee Compensation and Pensions, Letters to the Editor, News, Police Union Corruption, Political Corruption, Politics, Union Corruption | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off